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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
degrees in rapid city and seeing temps around 20 to 25 above average and areas of south dakota, 35 degrees above your average, very warm temps there and we still have our problems across parts of the west and the next storm moving into northern california and this one is a very strong one. very significant rain will fall here, some areas eight inches of rain and a lot of the rivers in central california concerned about flooding for today and tonight. and this storm storms by tomorrow, and another one comes in on tuesday, wednesday, lingers a little into thursday and then dry things out and this is the most potent of all and mostly rain, another warm system, but a steady stream of tropical moisture and it will bring light showers throughout parts of the ohio valley, to the great lakes, tonight and this afternoon. and behind it, temps are going to warm up a lot. in fact, today, the temps are extremely warm, across most of the country and pretty much the entire country is above where your average temps are this time of year and tomorrow, we'll see this heat builds further, getting to 61, dlee
that $250,000 range, right? that if you're a family living in, i don't know, a major city. >> juliet: new york city, for instance. >> dave: new jersey, connecticut. >> clayton: you're not living the dream. >> juliet: it's sort of subjective. well, actually not subjective you can look exactly at what people live here for 250 or people in san francisco, another expensive city, it doesn't go that long, didn't go that far. >> dave: the bottom line, it appears they've moved the goal post and it may be around the $400,000 mark and that may be the new 250 if you will. may be where ne get the deal done. and upwards towards the 500 mark, but here are two congressmen on perhaps moving this up. >> the $400,000 level seems to me to be about right, that represents about the top 1% of the income earners, the people who got 93% of the income growth our last year and that seems to be enough, but i think there's some flexibility there. >> it's about making sure that we can live within our means and address the real problem and that's spending. i kind of feel like i'm a lifeguard and we've got to save as m
. that should be winding down throughout the day today. as the we head into the northeast. new york city you are looking at very light accumulations. maybe 1 to 3 inches of snow. as we head a little bit further off to the west in the suburbs you could be looking at 4 to 6 inches of snow and also across pennsylvania and 3 to 6 inches of snowfall. a number of winter advisories. the big snowfall is first alert forecast across rhode island, eastern massachusetts and also portions of eastern connecticut snow possible new england region we could be looking up to a foot of snow out there. by sunday gone. it will be windy behind it and much colder. >> dave: that's the exactly what i need for my 4 a.m. commute tomorrow morning. thank you very much molina, bearer of bad news. >> juliet: hotel room time. let's get to some headlines. cops releasing video of the woman pushing a man in front of a subway train. she was talking to herself. cops have released this footage running away from the subway station. three cops were shot. prison worker eddie jones iii being processed on domestic violence and stalkin
bless me. and i just knew i had to help him. >> bill: a new york city police officer buys the homeless man some warm boots. wait until you hear the story surrounding the homeless guy. this is not what it appears to be. >> president obama met with leaders of the american indian tribe and they honored the president by giving him his own indian name running deficit. [ laughter ] >> the nation's debt is no laughing matter. lou dobbs will tell you why we are all in grave danger because of out-of-control government spending. three wise men, what did they do? >> jesse watters quizes the folks about christmas. >> they brought frankincense, miles an mur and. >> baby diapers? >> a wild wild waters world upcoming. >> caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone from california. factor begins right now. hi i'm bill o'reilly reporting from los angeles, thanks for watching us tonight. i'm here to do the leno program this evening. during the long flight across country, i had a chance to analyze something very important to you. all of us needs to wise up and fast. you may have heard the story of n
of a subway train in new york city. the man was killed and a woman who was talking to herself pushed him on the tracks. his back was turned and they don't know if he knew the woman. they are looking for her. it will be harder for people to load up. employees in delaware and 3 m will no longer get to go outside for a quick moke break. north dakota dack also banned smoke nothing public places. >> kelly: there is a discussion of how to keep our kids safe in school. >> the only way to stop a monster from killing our kids is to be personally involved and invested in a plan of absolute protection. the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun, is a good guy with a gun. >> kelly: that statement stirred up a lot of controversy. but our next guest agrees and has a solution of his own. tom horn is the attorney general of his own. he proposes arming one educator per school. attorney general horn, how did you come up with the plan and why are you trying to implement it. >> i tried to come up with a golden mean between two extremes. one point is teachers come nothing the school with guns. i think th
. just outside new york city a southwest jet got stuck in the mud after skidding off the runway. in some of the hardest hit area the roads are even worse. >> i lost count of number of cars in the ditch. a jackknifed tractor trailer and a horse trailer turned over. >> i have seen ten cars in an accident. i saw a lexus fly into the ditch. >> i wish people would slow down a little bit, you know. it is pretty slick. >> harris: the storm will go into the his tor the history br leaving behind a path of destruction from a tornado jut broke in the south to a record snowfall in arkansas that katipoer to hundreds of homes and businesses. some still without tonight. officials shay could be the situation for up to a week. meanwhile, heavy snow still falling across parts of the northeast even as people are already starting to dig out. straight to anna koiman live in pennsylvania. the conditions there? >> i can tell you that the death toll has crept up to 16 as a result of the storm that began wreaking havoc on christmas day in the midwest and the south and winter storm warnings remain in effect in no
to cymbalta.com to learn about a free trial offer. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >>> that's downtown worcester, massachusetts. oh, no. that's the white house. >> that's not worcester? >> it's not worcester. welcome back to "morning joe." i'm mike barnicle in for joe and mika. sam stein's here. he's sitting in the big boy chair. >> yeah. >> leigh gallagher is still with us, richard haass is still with us. along with richard wolffe in washington. joining us on set, best-selling author, host of the award-winning public radio program "studio 360," kurt andersen. how are you? >> good. happy new year. >> what's on your mind? >> you know, the two pounds i gained durin
poor back into the religious life. this came against the requirements of many cities that any trade would be permitted, for exhibit, and in the salvation army they made it a practice not to apply and to be arrested often playing their instruments on the way into the cell and challenging them as antireligious, and they won a lot of them. they also lost a lot of them so they kind of destabilized the law in the states by challenging these restrictions. they never really needed to the supreme court of the united states the because the states were still in howard. >> professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> the cases from the federal territory had come in the 19th century and questions of polygamy and that some of the state's and the major cases made it to the court in the late 1930's and early 1940's, really that new deal era and they tended not to be so much the salvation army of the jehovah's witness who also caused a lot of troubles. >> what was one of those cases? walk us through. >> well a very interesting case called cantwell agai
there was not a bubble in houston, raleigh, n.c., that winter? -- atlanta? it applied to those cities just as much as san francisco and miami, yet there were bubbles there and no balls in houston, omaha, -- bubbles in houston, ohio, -- global hawk, where have you. host: you conclude the book with "home ownership is not just an american dream, a dream of people all over the world. guest: that is absolutely right. a lot of research has shown that homeownership is one way to help people get out of poverty. if you want to start a small business, it turns out most are started with a loan on a business owner's home. if you want to put your kids through college, you can borrow against your home. homeownership is a way to build wealth. yet we have government saying we should get more people into apartments, fewer people into cinder the -- single-family homes. host: what is the track over last -- >> 8-to-10 years? guest: if we get rid of land use restrictions, i am optimistic, but if we do not, housing prices will go what, then we will be poised for another big financial crisis. host: john joins us from michigan.
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
of this city, the police commissioner of this city, and everybody in the white power structure of this city must take a responsibility for everything that jim clark does in this community. it's time for us to say to these men, that if you don't do something about it, we will have no alternative but to engage in broader and more drastic forms of civil disobedience in order to bring the attention of the nation to this whole issue in selma, alabama. amy goodman: dr. martin luther king. you were in the church, john lewis. rep. john lewis: it was an unbelievable speech. dr. king spoke out of his gut. sheriff clark was a very mean man. he was vicious. i think maybe he was a little sick. he wore a gun on one side, a nightstick on the other side. he carried an electric cow prodder in his hand-and he didn't use it on cows. when young- amy goodman: an electric cow prodder. rep. john lewis: that you use to move cattle along. and i remember on one occasion he was wearing a button on his left lapel that said "never." he thought he was a general in a military. he would wear a helmet like patton. he force
. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
for children, a city, a country at war with itself. what kind of things are these little girls seeing beyond the school gates? >> translator: we as educators don't support one side or the other. our concern is for the child to learn. so we keep the school open and help with their fears. we can't do as much as before, but the key thing is to try to deal with their anxiety. >> reporter: up, down, left, right, two, three, four. out in the playground it's a p-e lesson. exercises including running to the wall, touching it and running back. here, the running's for fun, but beyond the school walls, a shell or mortar can land anywhere any time, running could be a matter of life and death. for obvious reasons the killing of small children and teachers in and around school buildings is pretty near the top of the news agenda at the moment. so it is in this educational district and the one next door alone in the past two weeks, 35 small children and two teach verse been killed. the security building next to the school was car bombed recently, leaving a staff candid about the problems they face here. >>
in a very densely populated region of new york city, long island, and the southern portions of new york state. and so i think it's a stark reminder, a very real example, a very painful outcome that speaks to the need of investing, investing in our infrastructure. and so as we go forward there's also an opportunity to improve upon what existed at the time of these storms. for instance, in the energy networks, utility networks, we can do state of the art. we have taught other nations how to build those systems. it's time to do nation building at home. and i think the beauty here is that while we invest in transportation and other infrastructure, energy infrastructure and water systems and treatment centers and treatment systems and public schools, what we're doing is rippling into the benefits of efficiency, of public safety, of employment and economic development. that is a positive series of dynamics that then lifts the economy and provides for work. 90% of the jobs, it's projected, that come from this sort of infrastructure investment are speaking to middle income households. jobs that
parents? >> yes. that was part of my interest. back in the new york city public schools, i had a great teacher. mrs. rauf would read -- mrs. roth would read the newspaper and the about martin luther king. he was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughn
moving through kansas city, des moines and towards chicago and green bay. that is going to cause major travel problems as we get into thursday and friday. people are getting home for christmas and this is going to cause some major, major problems on the roads and in the air. there's your snow accumulation, 12 to 18 inches. in some cases we could see over two feet of snow and then as we move into the interior northeast that's where we also will see the snow as we get into friday and saturday. megyn, on the warm side of the storm, a threat for tornados across mississippi river valley. all the big cities later on today. tomorrow as we get across the southeast. so all of these areas need to be watching it, affecting millions upon millions of people. of course folks are gearing up for the christmas holiday season. people will be traveling. this will throw a big wrench into someone's plans. megyn: we'll have severe thunderstorms in the southeast. we'll have severe snowstorms from the rockies to the midwest. what is going to be happening in the northeast? >> the northeast will get the tail en
the other side of this case. host: you represent a very urban area? tesco i have nothing outside the city limits of louisville -- calleguest: i have nothing outse the city limits of louisville. as a kid, i went to summer camp and got my certificate of sharpshooting. i always thought guns or something the good guys used to ward off the bad guys bending most frequently, guns are used -- when they are in society, they are used by bad guys. i have always been afraid of them. i live in a community where there are more people who are afraid of them because they have direct contact with them on an almost daily basis. that fear i think gives me a right to be free to go to a grocery, theater, or a mall without having to carry a gun to protect myself. host: if you were in a different district in kentucky, with your position be a political death wish in a sense? guest: there is a good chance it would be. my colleague who lost this year represented the lexington area and always felt without a rating from the nra, he could not survive. he fel ttha tway and i suspect many of the other districts in kent
: beautiful. it's called chamber of commerce weather for the city of cleveland. it's snowing sideways. the snow is coming in from lake erie and every once in a while we get one of these gusts that force me to turn my back to that wind because it puts the big fat snowflakes right in our faces, but this city says they are prepared for what has already been an already dangerous and deadly storm. the middle of the country is starting to dig out from a blustery snowstorm. in waterloo, iowa, shovels and snowplows are back in use after more than eight inches of snow fell. good news for many businesses after a lackluster season a year ago. >> been delivering a lot of snow blowers, a lot of equipment has been breaking. we have been fixing equipment for people to get snow removed. >> reporter: picturesque in wisconsin, good for building snowmen but a challenge for crews clearing snow. >> the snow is really wet. a lot of buildup on the front of the plows and very hard for the snow to scour off the plows. >> reporter: storm conditions have caused havoc on a lot of roadways and left thousands of r
to reclaim land in that city that was pushed aside by saddam hussein when he was dictator. there is a problem with the rise of al qaeda in iraq and bank at the same time, iraq has not pulled over like they did in 2005. i think that is in part because all major parties are not prepared to go to the brink like that and i think there is some hope that over time the u.s. engagement with the iraqi military can be a positive thing. you can see if things -break the right way with iraq, you see a relationship with the army that would be much different than the u.s. relationship with the egyptian military, that you would really find a more mature relationship. host: our guest is a senior national security correspondent. from minnesota on our republican line, go ahead. color code do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to -- caller: do you think the israeli-palestinian situation is going to come to a head pretty soon? do you think we should put pressure on israel to get rid of their nuclear weapons? if we really want peace over there, shouldn't we want everyone in that region do not hav
. it's not a solution to the gun violence we see. i was in chicago yesterday. a city in the midst of a killing epidemic. take a look at this map. >> it is not just in chicago or newtown. across america since 1979, more than 116,000 children and teenagers have been killed by guns. we can't listen to anymore of this nonsense from the nra. the time for their talk is over. now is the time for action and real change. on gun control. the way to meet a bad guy with a gun and stop him is to make sure he doesn't have a gun. they need protection from bad guys having protection from them. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. happy holiday. >> coming out here to m mt. rushmore, it reminds you that there are big issues at stake. issues of equality. issue of the pursuit of happiness. issues of freedom and this country standing for something. these guys were all looking forward to what they wanted to build in this country. every one of them. and this place reminds you of that. it's not just about petty arguments over tax and environmental regulations. but it's about
time. i worked in new york city for about 28 years as a bilingual teacher and a certified credit counselor. if i could just give my personal testimony, i think you may be relevant to the issue here. i studied at hunter city college in new york for a master's degree in counseling. a masters degree, at that time, acquired only 30 credits -- graduate credits. i was in the last class that certified the 30 credits and afterwards it became 38 and now i believe it is 60. my training, i thought, was quite good. we had very experienced and talented professors. the objective was to put on the front lines some trained people to basically just be listening. to have the children referred to us and we have enough training to we could try to help them, or if we felt that the problem was severe enough, we could refer them. we had psychiatrists in new york available. school support teams. and i am now working in florida as is an adjunct professor at the college level. and my feeling is come, and i don't want to be too judgmental, but i think at the community college level and maybe colleges in ge
that information has not been updated for 40 years. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? stockridge to chelsea. >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to austin, texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to solve the fiscal cliff, i'm sure he'd like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song, i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the journalism broadcast center for organizing today's event. and i was wondering if you had one last song you'd like to sing us out on. [ap
served our efforts in this city and at home in indiana for the past 12 years. i leave this body truly humbled. when i look back at the caliber of the staff that we have been able to call to this mission. servant leaders all. they are men and women who approach each and every day with a servant's heart, made sacrifices over the years in order to serve the people of indiana with integrity and energy. names like bill smith and lonnie zanarky. josh pickcok, paul teller, mark short, brian neal, just to name a few. you know, i don't have time tonight to name all the men and women who served us in various capacities over these last 12 years, but i would ask unanimous consent to submit each and every one of their names to the congressional record this night. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. pence: before i yield the floor for the last time, let me close simply by speaking a word of confidence and one more word of gratitude. some people look on in washington, d.c., and they are rightly frustrated. some people can't come to this nation's capital -- some people can com
't the pending assault weapons ban legislation not include confiscation of existing weapons? guest: many cities have buy-back on guns and that is to give people the way to say, you may own a gun and whole issue of people who buy guns and sell guns illegally. that is straw purchasers. you need to go after them. but i think getting those guns off of our streets is extremely important and giving people the opportunity to turn those weapons back. we have done it where you can get vouchers for groceries or you get cash. there are hundreds and hundreds of guns that get turned in. the confiscation of guns all the time. any way, without going into the details, yes, i think we should do more to get the guns that are already illegally out there or legally and people say i want to turn it in. people who own guns legally, that they understand how to keep them safe and away from children or someone in your family who may not use them properly. host: get you on the record about the so-called fiscal cliff, progress being made is what we are reading in the newspapers. obama gives some ground on social security
i just laid out but, you know, elder -- an elder told me one time in urban cities you walk out the door, you go down the street to safeway for your food. in rural alaska, you open your door, what's in front of you, the nature that they see, is the grocery store. so when they have in our case the y.k. delta in the western part of alaska had devastating king salmon fishery loss in the sense of the qawpt of fish. when that fish is not able to be harvested to be put in the storehouses for the winter, the limited cash that they have in an area where fuel costs to heat their home are $8, $9, $12 a gallon, now have to go to not only heating they've set aside that cash for, now they have to get food shipped in. so their limited cash is now split between heating their home and putting food on the table. in fairbanks, alaska, which is urban, but outside, 40 below yesterday. so heating the home is not just like turning your heater on after work. it's a whole different ballgame. but they live off the land. it is not some hobby on the weekend, not a sports event. it's where they harvest the
for city council, for school boards, for municipal government that go unfilled every year because people don't run for them. and you can start anywhere. so i would say to all the women in the audience, to all of your children, to all of your girls cannot tell them to run because that is how we will get aoman president pierre >> that is a great point pierre >> i had 24 hours to make my decision about running the first time for state senate. i would not have run. i called my husband and said they asked me care at the kids and the law practice and you have your job. and my husband said you are really did this and we will make it work. >> the corollary about the minivan and the phone, my boys, when there were little, they used to say, mom, you are always on the phone. i told them that i get paid by the word. [laughter] >> i would not have run for senate if it were not for my husband. i quit my role as attorney general entered a year-and-a- half off of work. we went from one income -- we went from two incomes to one income. he said, i will make it work. i want your voicehere. it does take som
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)

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